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Best bass earphones 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated October 1, 2019

Charlie OliverMy name is Charlie Oliver. I have been a freelance writer for 20 years, focusing mainly on technology related topics. One of the most important sections in the article – the comparison charts for best bass earphones in 2018!

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. In this section we provide our readers with a comparison table of our top picks. Scroll past the table for a closer look at each of the 3 best bass earphones in our review section.

Best bass earphones of 2018

Customers need to be careful on how they spend their money on these products. Now, let’s get to the gist of the matter: which are the best bass earphones for the money? Check them out and decide which one suits you the best to splurge upon. The “Total” indicates the overall value of the product.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Design
4 points
5 points
4 points
Size
5 points
5 points
5 points
Construction
5 points
4 points
4 points
Price
5 points
4 points
4 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the bass earphones by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – BASN EbonBC200 in-ear Headphones with MMCX Interchangeable Cable

 
BASN EbonBC200 in-ear Headphones with MMCX Interchangeable Cable

Pros
Hand-crafted wood earbuds deliver natural sound with pleasant bass and ensure absolute enjoyment
Enable unique sound with low distortion thanks to Efficient and powerful dual neodymium drivers
Optimum wearing comfort and obvious noise isolation due to multi-size medical-grade silicon sleeves
Cons
Not found yet.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this bass earphones win the first place?

I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. The rear part fits perfectly! It is mounted really tight and reliable. I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack.

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Design

4

4star

Size

5

5star

Construction

5

5star

Price

5

5star

 

 

№2 – Arisen Phantom Metallic Bluetooth 4.1 Headphones

 
Arisen Phantom Metallic Bluetooth 4.1 Headphones

Pros
🎁 The all new Arisen Phantom Bluetooth headphones is now on Limited time sales! Buy 2 you will automatically get 15% OFF!
Arisen guarantee 60 days 100% money back if you don’t like this product. No gimmicks. The product is also protected by 12 month worry-free warranty, you are guaranteed to get a new one if anything happens.
Cons
Can be tedious to clean up.
A bit bulky.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this bass earphones come in second place?

I recommend you to consider buying this model, it definitely worth its money. The material is pretty strong and easy to wash if needed. Managers explained me all the details about the product range, price, and delivery. This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office.

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Design

5

5star

Size

5

5star

Construction

4

4star

Price

4

4star

 

 

№3 – Actionpie In-ear Headphones Earbuds High Resolution Heavy Bass with Mic for Smart Android Cell Phones Samsung HTC Lg G4 G3 Mp3 Mp4 Earphones

 
Actionpie In-ear Headphones Earbuds High Resolution Heavy Bass with Mic for Smart Android Cell Phones Samsung HTC Lg G4 G3 Mp3 Mp4 Earphones

Pros
VJJB-BS1,Uses magnetic neodymium iron boron magnets strongest drive unit, equipped with high – performance dynamic driver systems,6.0 MM*(Two Driver units) custom permanent magnet high-performance moving coil unit
Superb Sound with High Definition: Exclusive driver design pumps out the deepest bass soaring highs and ultra-clear midrange Soft silicone ear buds provide a super comfortable noise reducing fit
Cons
No advanced features despite the cost.
The cover is not ideal.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this bass earphones take third place?

This price is appropriate since the product is very well built. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. The material is incredibly nice to the touch. It has a great color, which will suit any wallpapers. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time.

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Design

4

4star

Size

5

5star

Construction

4

4star

Price

4

4star

 

 

bass earphones Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy bass earphones, right? No!

SoundMAGIC PL1In-Ear Super Bass Earphones

Next up is another great offering from SoundMAGIC, the PL11’s. Another great in-canal earphone from SoundMAGIC built specifically for those demanding more bass. The PL11’s design allows for super deep bass frequencies not normally found at this price point, whilst not sacrificing the mids and highs.

Brainwavz Delta IEM Earphones

For those truly on a budget the Brainwavz are our cheapest earphones. Don’t let the small price tag put you off, these earphones deliver great sound for their price bracket. With all-metal housings which are rare at this price, the Delta IEMs are tuned to sound good with any genre of music.

Plastic remote feels cheap

While they’re not the most dynamic or resolving headphones, NuForce shows us that the future of wireless headphones is a bright one.

Bass-heavy

The RHA T10i are here for one simple reason: their sound quality is incredible, thanks to the snug seal created when the headphones are stuck in your ear. The bass is also robust for such small earphones.

Narrow soundstage

Sure, they don’t have the most balanced sounding or highest resolution, but the water resistance and modular design of the Forza make them a pretty compelling option.

Master & Dynamic

The build is spot on and the styling is excellent (especially in the Brown and Silver version) A classy headphone that is capable of competing with headphone more than twice its price.

Fostex TH-900 MK2

Oh, and did I mention it was beautiful to boot? The carved wooden ear cups are as stunning in the hand as they are on the eye.  A true beast of build, style and sound.

MrSpeakers

The might still have hues of a DIY style build about them but the are a true bang for buck mid-tier audiophile grade headphone in a closed format.

Audio Technica M50x

Mobile music lovers have never had it so good – although the iPhone doesn’t have a headphone jack, the standard headphones you get with smartphones are at an all-time high in terms of quality.

This does tend to be flagship phones, though and cheaper ones might not even come with some in the box. Either way, spending a little to upgrade your earphones is one of the best ways to get the most from a smartphone, or any other portable music player. Here are the best cheap headphones under £100, with most under £50.

If you’re looking for something more premium and high-end then check out our chart of best headphones. If you’re current bargains, take a look at our pick of the best headphones deals.

The instant lift in audio quality needs to be heard to be believed – better, more impactful bass, crisper, more detailed treble and better isolation from the outside world are all worth the investment.

Choosing headphones isn’t just about improved audio quality, though – there are plenty of things to consider to make sure you end up with something that suits you perfectly.

In-line remotes and microphones

Once you’ve had headphones with an inline remote and microphone you’ll never go back. These allow you to answer calls, shuffle tracks and change the volume on audio playback, while the integrated microphone means you can carry on a conversation – and use voice activated software – without pulling your phone from your pocket. It’s a very useful addition to look out for.

Circumaural headphones

Circumaural is another way of saying that a pair of headphones totally enclose the ears they’re worn over – typically known as over-ear. The advantage to this is lots of bass and good isolation from outside noise. And, because the speakers are effectively sealed against the wearer’s head, there’s minimal sound leakage.

In-ear headphones

These are arguably the most common type you’ll see, and it’s obvious why. In-ear headphones are small, very portable, and don’t weigh very much.

Most of the in-ear headphones mentioned below are canal headphones, which means they have rubber grommets or tips on the end which are pushed slightly (and carefully) into the ear canal. This produces excellent audio quality, thumping bass and lots of noise isolation if you find the right size tips.

Noise isolation

Blocking out the outside world is an important job of a decent pair of headphones. Cancelling a rowdy office or the hum of the engines on a long flight can make life much more pleasant. At its most basic, noise isolation simply forms a seal around or inside the ear, preventing unwanted sound waves entering.

You don’t often find decent wireless headphones for under £50 but there are some to choose from in our list – handy for the likes of the iPhone We also have a chart just for the best wireless headphones.

Watch this

When buying a headphone these days people typically debate the style of headphone they want (in-ear, on-ear, around-ear) whether to go wired or wireless (or even totally wireless) and whether to opt for such extra features as active noise-cancellation to help muffle ambient noise. Oh, and then there’s price. Everybody has a budget.

If you’ve narrowed your choice down, we have plenty of models to choose from in our list of the best headphones, with breakdown of the best headphones in various categories including wireless, sports, noise-cancelling and cheap.

But if you’re still a little lost in the headphone maze, here’s some info that will hopefully help steer you in the right direction.

Features

The size, type and technology of a pair of headphones are all critical to a purchasing decision. But it’s important to demystify the bevy of features and headphone-specific vocabulary. Listed below are the most important features you’ll need to consider before finding the perfect pair of headphones.

Bass: Even at its very best, headphone bass is never the sort of pants-flapping, sock-it-to-your-gut experience you literally feel from massive speakers or subwoofers, but many manufacturers custom tune their “signature sound” to emphasize the lower frequencies, albeit at the cost of instrument separation and natural delivery. Earbuds are tiny and portable, but — except for a couple of high-end models — they can’t compete with full-size, over-the-ear headphones for deep bass response or visceral dynamic range.

Sealed (closed) vs. open: Sealed headphones — the noise-isolating, in-ear models or the full-size earcup designs — acoustically isolate your ears from your environment. Of course, the degree of isolation varies from one pair of headphones to another, and the seal limits the leakage of the headphones’ sound out to the room. Sealed models are ideal for private listening, where you don’t want the sound to be heard by other people. Open headphones — such as foam earpad models and many sports designs — are acoustically transparent and allow outside sound to be heard by the headphone wearer, and a good deal of the headphones’ sound will be audible to anyone near the listener.

Generally speaking, such headphones produce better, more “open” sound than sealed designs. Because they don’t block out everything from the outside world, open-backed headphones are recommended for outdoor activities, such as jogging, which require awareness of your environment.

Pro-style headphones are comparatively bulky and can feel uncomfortably heavy after hours of use. Lighter headband-style headphones are almost always more comfortable than heavier ones. And even if they’re not, they’re less of a hassle to carry around.

Cable dressing and length: Most stereo headphones have just one cable, usually attached to the left earpiece (sometimes called single-sided cabling). Some models — and all earbuds — use a Y-cable that connects to both earpieces (double-sided). The actual cable plug, meanwhile, is usually one of two designs: a straight I-plug or an angled L-plug; the latter may be useful if your portable player has a side- or bottom-mounted headphone jack.

Quick reference glossary

Frequency response: Frequency-response specifications in full-size loudspeakers are generally pretty useless in predicting sound quality, but headphone frequency-response numbers are even worse. Manufacturers have routinely exaggerated frequency-response figures to the point that they’re irrelevant. Even the flimsiest, cheap headphones routinely boast extremely low bass-response performance –15Hz or 20Hz — but almost always sound lightweight and bright. Generally, bass buffs will be happier sticking with larger ‘phones.

Total harmonic distortion: True, headphones with lower actual total harmonic distortion (THD) will sound better than those with higher THD. But the quoted THD numbers — “less than percent” — aren’t helpful in predicting sound quality. Listen to recordings of simply recorded acoustic guitar to assess the distortion of one set of headphones versus another. Some will sound appreciably cleaner than others.

Impedance: Generally speaking, the lower the headphones’ electrical impedance (aka resistance), the easier it is to get higher volume. But here again, the low impedance is no guarantee of high volume capability; other factors can still limit loudness potential. Since many MPplayers have feeble power output — the iPod is a notable exception — smart shoppers should check the loudness before purchasing any pair of headphones. To be sure, listen with your player.

V-MODA Forza Metallo 

Simple enough! In today’s world of audio, getting your fix of bass is never too far away. You can go to your favorite club and catch a great EDM, drum & bass, or hip hop set. You can get a ridiculous sound system for your car that will set off other car’s alarms as you drive by. You can also get a subwoofer to accompany your speakers, and take your bass at home or in your music studio to the next level.

But what about headphones? Reproducing and truly feeling those low lows within the confined space of a headphone ear cup is challenging. Lucky for you, nearly every headphone manufacturer has honed in on the need for headphones that excel at thundering bass, and today there are tons of options for you to consider. We did some serious research and put in hours of testing between dozens of models to bring you our guide to the best headphones for bass.

V-Moda Crossfade M-100

As the direct link between you and your music, your choice of headphones is an extremely important and personal one. With so many headphones now on the market it can be a difficult task to settle on the right pair for you. While no headphone is perfect, the V-Moda Crossfade M-100 comes about as close as possible. Stellar sound, fantastic bass, and immaculate construction make it one of the top performing headphones around.

Sound and Bass Response

The fantastic build and extra features mean nothing however if the sound quality isn’t there and fortunately the M-100 provides excellent sound across the spectrum. The highs shimmer and have a warm feel to them, which is a nice contrast to the shrill piercing highs of many lower end headphones. That’s not to say the high end is reduced at all. On the contrary the M-100 can reach frequencies of up to 30kHz, about 10kHz higher than the human ear can detect. It’s simply that those high frequencies are not screeched into your ear. Instead the best tones are brought out and the harshest ones are reigned in. The middle range is less prominently featured. It certainly doesn’t disappear; it just won’t jump out at you. It complements and reinforces the high end and the low end well.

On to the Main event: The bass of the M-100 is a force to be reckoned with. V-Moda’s 50mm “Dual Diaphragm Drivers” pump out some of the most powerful bass on the market. Reaching down to 5Hz (the average person can only hear down to ~20Hz) the M-100 has no difficulty reproducing even the deepest sounds in your favorite music. The sound is as pure as it gets with no distortion, even at the lowest frequencies, played at the highest volumes. Despite having such a strong low end the bass does not overpower the higher registers (which is a common issue with other bass heavy headphones). Instead, it feels more like placing a subwoofer along two already nice speakers, enriching the sound rather than overpowering it.

Other Info

One additional fun feature of the M-100s is the customization. In addition to the four color options currently offered, you are able to have any logo you want laser-etched into the “shield” on the side of the ear cup. These laser-etched shields can be a multitude of colors in aluminum or fiber. Alternatively if you really want to step it up, you can choose to have your design 3D printed into the shield. Then, as if that wasn’t enough, you can even choose to have your shields made of precious metals such as silver, gold, or Platinum (it should be noted that these are purely aesthetic choices and the more valuable materials do come at an up-charge).

Sennheiser MOMENTUM 2.0 Over-Ear

It’s hard to make a “best headphones” guide and not have Sennheiser show up to the party. The German company is no stranger to making very well-loved headphones for all applications – super high-end audiophile, studio, DJ, casual listening, in-ear… and now, amazing bass response. To be fair, the Sennheiser MOMENTUM 2.0 Over-Ear Headphones, much like the V-Moda M-100, are not marketed specifically for their bass response. These are marketed as achieving audiophile sound quality, yet maintaining daily portability. And granted they do a really good job at that, but the reason they are on this list is because they are widely regarded as some of the best headphones for bass. Let’s find out why…

Build and Features

The Sennheiser MOMENTUM 2.0 are the top-of-the-line of the MOMENTUM series, and improve on the first generation MOMENTUM over-ear headphones in just about every way. From the moment you take these out of the box, they ooze quality and polish. You get a luxurious semi-hardshell case covered in a felt-like material, and a soft pouch for even more protection. This headphone folds for portability, which is a plus (folding mechanism seems durable). While you don’t have as much customization available as the V-Moda M-100, these do come in color options:. It’s all subjective, but we’re not a fan of the brown. Ivory is nice if you’re going for more of a classy look, but the ones we opted for are the lean-and-mean black color which looks great (you can never go wrong with black). Style-wise, these are on-point. Whether you’re just looking at them or wearing them on your head, they look really proportional and polished. You’ve got brushed metal, a leather headband with contrast stitching, and the Sennheiser logo is hologram-like and changes color depending on the angle you’re looking from. Again, premium all around. The construction overall is very solid, and mostly metal and leather (as opposed to Bose and Beats that have a lot of plastic).

The MOMENTUM 2.0 comes with a detachable 3ft cable of pretty average quality (V-Moda’s cable wins hands-down here). When you’re buying these from an online store, you can pick between Android or iOS, which affects the integrated in-line remote. The 3.5mm plug has a unique locking mechanism so that it stays in place and can’t easily be yanked out (a feature we can appreciate).

However, the sound quality extends well into the mids and highs. The mids in particular are extremely detailed, making these well-suited to listening to genres like jazz and classical; The smallest nuances can be heard in vocals and guitars. In terms of isolation, while they don’t block external noise to the extent of a noise-cancelling headphone, the MOMENTUM 2.0 does a really nice job. Unless you crank them to near max volume, they don’t leak much noise to the outside due to a good seal.

Audio-Technica ATH-PRO700MK2

Japanese company Audio-Technica is well-regarded in the headphone world for making some “best in class” headphones for all sorts of uses. We’ve previously written a glowing review of Audio-Technica studio headphones, so we were excited to try out some of their bass-heavy offerings. The Audio-Technica ATH-PRO700MKtakes a spot as one of the best headphones for bass available today.

Design

It still showcases the hallmark Beats design and is available in many attractive finishes such as glossy or matte black, white, gold, rose gold, and silver. We are loving the matte black and matte silver models because their texture matches the look and feel of the iPhone and is less prone to fingerprints (and scratches). What we love about the newest models of the best selling Solo, are that the appearance is less aggressive and more mature. For instance, you can now pull off a Beats headphone if you are over 2The bright red “B” logo has now been color-matched to the shade you pick.Think more sophisticated and mature.

Whereas some testers weren’t that over the moon about the plastic design, almost all liked the controls of the Beats SoloThe left earcup includes the 3.5mm input for use when the battery is dead. The Beats logo found on the right earcup is actually the button that controls playback, navigates tracks, and answers/ends calls depending on how many times you tap it. Tapping the ring above or below the “B” logo controls the volume levels and the right earcup also controls power and pairing. The Solohas a mic hidden in the ear cup to let you take calls, but it is important to note that this model does not have active noise cancellation. They are fine for those who want some isolation and muffling of outside noises, or don’t want the sound from the headphones to escape and disturb others. They do both well.

One other great feature of the Solois that it folds easily and compactly and comes with a durable and handy carrying case.

Comfort

When it comes to on-ear headphones, it is very rare to find a pair that is both comfortable and securely fitted. We feel that the Beats Solodoes a good job of marrying these two ideas. The Solofeels substantial and solid, but is surprisingly lightweight. The headband is sturdy – there is no flexing of the material – and the earcups swivel to aid in a better fit.

We had no issues when briskly walking outside and working around the office and house – some testers used them at the gym and on a brisk run, but it is important to note that the Solois not considered sweatproof.

We would definitely recommend them for shorter listening sessions, but for those who wear headphones all day, you are best to check out an over-ear model like the super comfortable Bose QuietComfort 3or the Sony H.ear On Wireless NC.

Features

Time to geek out a bit. The Apple WBluetooth chip is the abracadabra that makes the Soloa better buy than its predecessors. It makes pairing your Apple device as simple as the good ‘ole days when you just plugged in a wire. It also has ridiculously long battery life, touting 40 hours, and the Wacts as the magic wand that stretches out the juice in a same size battery.

Additional Information

If you are not using iCloud, the connection is still very quick, and if you don’t use iOS devices at all, the SoloWireless still operate as standard Bluetooth headphone.When you connect the included audio cable, the Soloautomatically powers down. We found no dramatic difference in audio performance between wireless and wired modes. The same cable even comes with an inline remote for music and phone calls making it pretty versatile.

Comfort

What impressed us was the soft leather and ultra lightweight brushed aluminum that made these headphones feel like a premium model.

The ear cups were also very pleasant and did not create as much ear fatigue or head pinching as some on-ear models.

Aukey Latitude Wireless Headphones

Headphones — the original wearable tech — have grown up. They’ve also become specialized; there’s a pair for every use, from sweat-resistant fitness headphones to commuter-friendly active noise-cancelling cans. And each of those types comes with different fit options: on-ear, over-ear or in-ear. Heck, there are even bone-conduction headphones, that sit behind your ear instead of over or in them.

Just to shake things up even further, Apple has ushered in a new era of headphone jack-less smartphones thanks to its latest smartphones that are causing wireless and Lightning-based headphones — including the company’s own AirPods —  to thrive.

Noise Cancelling

Having a good set of active noise-cancelling headphones can make the difference between a peaceful commute or flight and a chaotic one. Enter the Bose QuietComfort 3II headphones, which keep the sleek design, best-in-class noise cancelling and crystal-clear audio quality and add a dedicated button to activate Google Assistant. Some of the best headphones on the market just got a whole lot smarter.

How We Test Headphones

To help you separate the wheat from the chaff when shopping for headphones, Tom’s Guide evaluates the following criteria: design, comfort, features, performance and value. We employ a rigorous review process, comparing products with similar fit, features and pricing.

Each pair is worn over the course of a week for hours at a time. During this testing period, the staff is evaluating comfort, ease of use and, of course, audio quality. We listen to several predetermined sample tracks that span a number of genres, including hip-hop, rock, jazz, classical and R&B, and we evaluate the volume, clarity and fullness.

In terms of features, we test the effectiveness of active noise cancelling, Bluetooth range and battery life. For the fitness-focused models, we test to see how they stand up to vigorous workouts, evaluating both how securely they fit while we exercise and how well they handle ambient noise from things like falling weights and gym machines.

Once we complete our testing, we rate headphones based on our ten-point system (= worst, = best). If a product is truly exemplary, it’s awarded an Editors’ Choice.

And now that more streaming music services are offering high-resolution resolution audio, be sure to read our audio codec FAQ for everything you need to know about FLAC files, MP3s and everything in between.

Edifier P28Sport

Sleek sporty look with a perfect fit, the P28Sport are some new budget kings on the block. Coming in at £24.9they are a huge step up to any headphones that come with a phone.

Offering a well balanced sound with good kick down low, they offer an engaging and fun listening experience when out and about, yet still allow plenty of detail to be heard. From top to bottom there are not real peaks or dips, they have a smooth and easy to listen to sound. What is also great is the inclusion of a microphone and button for taking calls or skipping tracks.

SoundMAGIC E10C

The E10C has tight bass with plenty of weight – the mids are well defined and the top end sparkles. These earphones are perfect for listening on the go as the sound is fun and they will sound great with whatever you throw at them. If you have £40 to spend on some new earphones then go for the SoundMAGIC E– if you need an in-line microphone then go for the E10C. Easy.

MEE Audio MPro

If you are looking for a more detailed and neutral sound than the E10C, take a look at the MEE Audio MPro. With it’s monitor like sound and styling, detachable cable and great looks, it is a steal for under £50.

Well the MPro with Blackbird S20 foam tips may have become a new favourite for under £50. These really managed to have everything and sound very engaging, the highs do not disappoint with their presence and tone, the midrange is slightly up front and the mid bass has a mild boost, as a stage monitor I can see these being good and the sound would be easily tuneable with EQ.

For under £50 you won’t find this level of detail, clarity or separation from another in-ear headphone. Add to that brilliant build quality and you have a winner.

Oriveti Basic

Looking for a more bass oriented in-ear headphone with an upfront and engaging sound, yet without losing out on the finer details and comfort, you need the Oriveti Basic.

A 10mm titanium coated driver supplies an impressive amount of bass. Now I am not much of a bass head but after listening to these for a while I found myself really enjoying them.

Oriveti are new on the scene and they certainly know how to make an entrance. The new Oriveti Basic earphone packs a punch and gives you plenty of features for its modest price tag.

Dunu DK-3001

Our top pick for under £500 is the Dunu DK-3001, with impressive technical capabilities that are really enjoyable to listen to as well. Punchy and clear sound with a wide soundstage, these are truly excellent.

The Dunu DK-300is a very well done hybrid IEM, the bass is dynamic and punchy, with excellent and realistic body. The midrange is well layered and very detailed, with a hint of smoothness to it. The highs are always present, yet not fatiguing. These work well with all genres, the bass is fun and energetic in EDM, and rock comes across with detail and layering. Jazz has a very natural tone, and they just take all genres in their stride, however their ability to control heavy metal is truly impressive.

Audeze iSINE 20

If you don’t mind the open back design, the Audeze iSine20 will offer a listening experience more like a full size headphone than an in-ear model.

Offering an open sound with excellent punch the iSine20 offers a relaxing listening experience with slightly polite treble. Keeping in tone with their house sound the iSine20 offers good bass quantity with non-fatiguing treble and a natural tone. This is a very unique IEM that is well worth looking into if you want a more traditional headphone sound. The sound is slightly v-shaped; it’s a warmish, ‘fun’ tuning yet still retains excellent detail retrieval.

Open Back vs Close Back

Open-back headphones are designed so that the outer shell of the ear covering is perforated in some fashion, typically with horizontal cutouts. Closed-back headphones have a solid outer shell with no perforations of any sort such that the shell effectively cups the entire ear. Think of open-back models as having a colander-like-shell (lots of openings) and closed-back models as having a mixing-bowl-shell (solid construction from edge to edge, no openings).Open-back headphones are designed so that the outer shell of the ear covering is perforated in some fashion, typically with horizontal cutouts.

Now, while the terminology corresponds clearly to the physical design of the headphones it doesn’t do a very good job indicating what exactly which one should be chose. We provide a simplar standard. If your environment is quiet, or if you like to feel immersed in the surrounding environment, such as listening to music at the same time, feel the sound of rain with the wind blowing, then open-back is your choice. If you need absolute quiet, do not want any sound other than music to bother you, then close-back is the better choice.

When you listen to the same material through different headphones, you’ll hear differences that are due in part to “sweetening.” Sweetening refers to the EQing of the headphones to make the music sound better. In open-backed headphones and many earbuds, for instance, the bass frequencies may be emphasized to counter the natural leakage of bass through the open back or ear canal.

Most general-listening, consumer headphones are sweetened in some way. There are two common sweetening modes: Free Field (FF) and Defined Field (DF). The first simulates an open listening environment without reflection, and the latter simulates an enclosed listening environment such as a room. For critical listening such as monitoring a mix, you don’t want any sweetening at all, but rather a flat frequency response that lets you compare and set levels precisely.

Fit and comfort

Comfort is important. Any headphone will feel fine worn briefly, but when worn for long periods, many become uncomfortable. Wear the headphones for at least 20 minutes before deciding about comfort. The larger the ear cups the better when selecting closed-back, circumaural headphones. For headphones that rest on your ear, smaller is better, and fabric padding or leather can soften the pressure.

Sennheiser HD 280 PRO Headphones have a closed-back design that blocks loud external noises while preventing recorded sound from leaking into open mics.

The headband also influences comfort. Most headphones have an over-the-head style headband, but behind-the-neck styles are also available. Earbuds dispense with the band entirely, so are more comfortable in that regard. Whatever the type of headband, you want it to be adjustable. Another feature for enhancing comfort is the rotating cup, especially on over-the-ear phones. You can adjust them to your head to reduce leakage and increase comfort.

Krk Kns 6400 Studio Reference Headphones

Behringer Hpx6000 Professional DJ Headphones

Headphones

From cheap earbuds to replace the ones that came with your phone to high-end over-ear headphones, our experts (and our listening panels) have found the best headphones in every category so you can get the best sound for your buck. We list both wired and wireless options to make sure you can listen to your favorite songs or podcasts in every situation you might want to.

Great Value

If value for money is the deciding factor for you, then there are plenty of good options you can find. The Maxell Amp B Amplified Heavy Bass Headphones have a strong bass signal but aren’t expensive. These headphones have a stylish print on the earcup which snugly covers your ear to provide sealed sound. With a 40 mm driver, this is one of those products that you can just buy in a glimpse without thinking too much.

Not only do you get decent sound, but you also get high portability thanks to the folding capability. You can virtually use them with any device and take them with you wherever you go.

Headphones are one piece of technology that is often underrated. There was a time when headphones weren’t able to produce high-quality, but those days are gone, especially with these on the market.

The Bass Issue with Headphones

This type of bass headphones covers the ears entirely. They are big but provide complete isolation for high-quality bass. In studios and most professional settings, this is the preferred type. Because of their size, they’re less portable than other types.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the bass earphones by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your bass earphones wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of bass earphones

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about bass earphones is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!

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