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Best potato masher 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated March 1, 2019
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Charlie OliverHi there, I’m Charlie Oliver. After 40 hours of research including speaking with consultants and experts, and plenty of parents and 19 hours spent testing 10 potato masher, I believe that I found the best potato masher of 2018.

I will go through the main features and what you should consider when deciding which one to pick over the other. In this article, I’ve listed down the Top 3 list. These are the best potato masher your money can buy.

Best potato masher of 2018

Customers need to be careful on how they spend their money on these products. I review the three best potato masher on the market at the moment. After carefully examining the reviews and ratings of the people who have used them earlier this listicle has been made. You can make a choice based on the my list as you shop.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Ease of use
4 points
4 points
5 points
Size
5 points
4 points
4 points
Performance
5 points
5 points
4 points
Quality
5 points
5 points
4 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the potato masher by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – PriorityChef Potato Ricer and Masher

 
PriorityChef Potato Ricer and Masher

Pros
MASHING POTATOES IS MADE EASY. Don’t you wish you can create perfectly smooth and fluffy mash with less effort? With this product, you can achieve a creamy, heavenly dish quickly and conveniently. It is comfortably cushioned and ergonomically designed, making it a welcome relief for people with arthritis.
Cons
For such a price and the level of quality it can’t even have any cons, only pick holes.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this potato masher win the first place?

I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. The rear part fits perfectly! It is mounted really tight and reliable. The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack. I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch!

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Ease of use
4

4star

Size
5

5star

Performance
5

5star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

№2 – U.S. Kitchen Supply – Premium Quality Stainless Steel Potato Masher with our Wide and Ergonomic Horizontal Handle Great for making Super Smooth Mashed Potatoes

 
U.S. Kitchen Supply - Premium Quality Stainless Steel Potato Masher with our Wide and Ergonomic Horizontal Handle  Great for making Super Smooth Mashed Potatoes

Pros
COMMERCIAL GRADE POTATO MASHER: Quality heavy duty high performing rust resistant stainless steel potato masher. A very sturdy and durable dent-resistant masher that’s made with heavy duty polished quality stainless steel and is built to last for a lifetime of repeated daily use.
Cons
Inner parts not as hardwearing as other models.
A little bit shallow.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this potato masher come in second place?

I like this product. For such a low price, I didn’t even hope it to be any better. It’s decently made. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture. I really liked it. It is amazing in every aspect. It did even exceed my expectations for a bit, considering the affordable price. The design quality is top notch and the color is nice.

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Ease of use
4

4star

Size
4

4star

Performance
5

5star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

№3 – Spring Chef Stainless Steel Potato Masher with Easy to Use and Clean Wire Head Best for Mashed Potatoes

 
Spring Chef Stainless Steel Potato Masher with Easy to Use and Clean Wire Head Best for Mashed Potatoes

Pros
INTRODUCTORY SALE PRICE – LET’S FACE IT, MADE FROM SCRATCH JUST TASTES BETTER – Now it’s easier than ever to make healthy food at home without slaving away in the kitchen all day. Cut down your prep time and get food on the table faster. Get the best consistency and texture using the masher’s wire head that works quickly and efficiently without tiring your hand.
Cons
The handle could be of better quality.
Not enough for all services.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this potato masher take third place?

This price is appropriate since the product is very well built. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. We are very pleased with the purchase — the product is great!

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Ease of use
5

5star

Size
4

4star

Performance
4

4star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

potato masher Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy potato masher, right? No!

Pull Quote

For speed, the shape of the perforations matters more than the size of the masher plate.

Because of its grid (or waffle-patterned) plate, the OXO masher cut through the potato like butter. Whereas mashers with round holes, such as the Cuisipro and the Jamie Oliver, would flatten the potato into a pancake and then slide around on it, the OXO Good Grips Smooth Potato Masher cut straight through the potato all the way to the bottom of the bowl with one downward twisting motion. In fact, in our tests we found that for speed, the shape of the perforations matters more than the size of the masher plate.

With some of the other mashers, potato tended to get stuck on the plate, and I had to stop intermittently to scrape it off. But with the OXO, the potato either slid off or could be flung off, which made for faster, more efficient mashing. The grid’s larger holes also made it easier to clean than the competition; any remaining potato bits rinsed right off under running water.

The OXO’s short U-shaped handle offers better leverage. In contrast to a stick handle, where you’re using mostly your forearm in a straight-up-and-down motion, the OXO’s design lets you engage your elbow to punch downward with more power. You get less strain on your forearm because your wrist is in a more neutral position, and by pressing the masher down with the meaty part of your palm, you can put some body weight into the motion. Because you can easily hold the OXO one-handed, your other hand is free to hold the bowl steady. The soft, rubbery handle helps you keep a comfortable, firm grip, even if your hand is wet. Its short, fat shape allows it to fit fairly easily in a drawer or a dishwasher, though not in a utensil container like a stick model would. You can also hang it from a peg or hook.

In our mashed potato face-off, we found the OXO made a fluffy mash on a par with riced potatoes. One person on our original tasting panel preferred the even consistency of the riced spuds, while another liked the slight lumpiness of the mashed potatoes, but I thought they were pretty much equivalent (perhaps tasting more potato-y even), as did the tasters on the panel for our update. And in fact, packed into the same container and reheated a couple of days later, the two batches were indistinguishable from each other. For the effort involved, the OXO masher was the clear winner.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

As mentioned, the U-shape means the OXO probably won’t fit in a utensil crock, but it’s otherwise much more compact than other versions. If you can’t spare any drawer space, try our runner-up.

After a year of occasional use, the OXO Good Grips Smooth Potato Masher has held up and continues to be our preferred tool for mashing potatoes.

Runner-up with a straight handle

The Best Manufacturers Waffle Head Potato Masher has plate perforations like our top pick and is nearly as effective at getting to the bottom of the bowl. It’s about 1½ ounces lighter than the OXO Good Grips Smooth Potato Masher, which makes mashing things faster a bit easier, but its stick handle is more awkward to wield and provides less power in mashing. It also has a smaller face plate. With a little extra work, it can make potatoes almost as smooth as the OXO can.

The metal handle is less comfortable and could be slippery, but overall the masher has a slim profile and can fit in a utensil container or drawer. It’s as easy to clean as the OXO.

We prefer the ease of use and the fluffy-textured mash of the OXO Good Grips Smooth Potato Masher, but if you want a ricer for a slightly grainier, airier texture (for recipes like gnocchi), the Chef’n FreshForce Potato Ricer was the clear winner in our tests. Its clever design required significantly less effort to use compared with the other ricers we looked at, its handles were the easiest to hold, and its two-piece construction made it convenient to fill and clean.

Care and maintenance

Mashers and ricers are relatively straightforward to operate, but food mills, as our expert Tim Kemp pointed out, can be prone to user error. For all of the models except the Mirro Foley, you should put the disc in with the rough, convex (pointy) side facing up, and then you should insert the shaft into the hole to hold the disc in place. To pass the food through the disc, turn clockwise. If you’re processing dense, wet foods like tomatoes or apples, usually turning the handle counterclockwise will catch any large chunks that get stuck, but you may occasionally have to use a spatula or something similar to scrape the food down under the blade.

Cleaning potato bits off all these tools is much easier if your kitchen faucet has a spray attachment, but in our tests none of the tools were really difficult to wash. You’ll definitely be doing yourself a favor if you at least give the tool a thorough rinse before the potato has dried. If you do end up with a spud-encrusted masher, ricer, or food mill, a good soak in warm or hot water should take care of it. You may also want to try using a bottle brush to get into all those tight spaces in a ricer or food mill.

The competition

The Prepara Flip Masher produced smooth but drier, less creamy mash than our top pick in our tests, and the straight handle requires a little more effort to use. It does perform a neat trick, however: Squeeze the legs holding the mashing disc, and you can rotate the disc so the whole thing stores flat.

The Cuisipro Potato Masher seemed promising at the outset because its handle is shaped like the highly rated OXO’s, and it has a plate with greater surface area. However, it was completely ineffective at mashing. The ovoid, tire-tread-like perforations didn’t cut through any of the potato. The Cuisipro managed only to flatten the potatoes against the bottom of the bowl without breaking them up at all and then slid across the compacted surface, knocking a potato out of the bowl.

The stick-handled Jamie Oliver Stainless Steel Masher required two hands and a lot of effort. Rather than mashing, the round perforations just punched out pieces of potato, leaving little cylindrical nuggets of spud that stuck in the holes. Cleaning was consequently a pain, because I had to really get in there and pop those cylinders out.

The Harold Import Dual Potato Masher stacks a plate with round perforations above a wire zigzag loop. The heaviest model of the group, it required a great deal of effort to mash. Much of the potato didn’t make it from the bottom wire loop through the top plate, and I had to continually scrape potato off each level between mashings, a difficult task since the bi-level assembly obscured the view.

The spring-shaped head of the Dreamfarm Smood seemed promising, but in practice, mashing merely compressed the head and flattened the potatoes into a pancake. To break up the potatoes, I had to work it around and back and forth in the bowl, which required a lot more effort than I used with our top pick and our runner-up. It also resulted in a gummy, pasty mash that still had large, unpleasant chunks in it.

We eliminated the WMF Profi Plus in the testing we did last year for our party hosting guide because the stainless handle was too slippery, the mashing plate was small, and it was hard to get smooth results with.

The wire Harold Import Two In One Potato Masher Mix ’n’ Mash, which looks a little like a flattened whisk, is just a variation on the inefficient zigzag-wire style.

We dismissed the Cuisipro Fiberglass/Nylon Potato Masher because it’s made of nylon and isn’t any cheaper than similar stainless-steel models.

In testing ricers, I quickly learned that bigger is not better. I wasn’t able to get the Norpro Deluxe Cast Aluminum Jumbo Potato Ricer to mash even the same amount as a regular-size ricer. All the potato just got jammed into one solid cake at the bottom of the hopper, and no matter how hard I pushed, I couldn’t force the plunger any farther. I eventually gave up and scraped all the potato into the Chef’n to get the job done. Encountering this problem when trying to tackle a huge quantity of potatoes would be especially terrible.

I had the same issues with the RSVP Endurance Jumbo Potato Ricer. It required an unreasonable amount of effort yet still couldn’t pass most of the potatoes fed into its hopper. For the amount of space it takes up, this is unacceptable.

The Browne Stainless Steel Potato Ricer is uncomfortable to use. The edges of the handles are sharp, and they bite into your hands when you squeeze. The action feels a little rough, too. It’s one piece, so it’s cumbersome to fill and clean.

Although the Kuhn Rikon Potato Ricer has recommendations from the Los Angeles Times and Good Housekeeping, we found it awkward to use. It’s remarkably bulky because it has storage for its discs built into the head, but the hopper is regular size. It’s even more cumbersome than the Browne ricer because it’s so top-heavy. The handles are slippery when wet and too large for small hands to get around.

We also passed on testing the MIU France ricer. It has the same design as the poorly performing Norpro Deluxe, and its handles appear even less comfortable.

The Kuchenprofi Professional Stainless Steel Vegetable Mill, the most expensive model we tested, was the most effective at passing; it left me with nearly dry tomato skins and seeds, and it didn’t need any scraping down at all. However, its handle—a wire loop that’s a little wide for small hands—is uncomfortable and can be slippery when wet, so holding the mill steady can be hard. While most of the food mills in our test group came with three discs, this one had four, with the additional “grating disc” meant to be used for tough-skinned items like apples, bell peppers, or tomatoes. But the extra disc doesn’t make up for the price, the uncomfortable handle, or the unstable base.

The Mirro Foley Stainless Steel Food Mill is not designed like any of the others. It looks more like a saucepan with perforations in the bottom. The handle is a metal loop like the Kuchenprofi’s but a little narrower. The single hole size is quite fine, and in our tests it seemed to juice the tomatoes more than pulp them, leaving the greatest amount of pulp behind. Unlike with the other mills, the handle isn’t spring-loaded into slots on either side of the hopper but is instead held in place with a thumbscrew on the underside. The effort required to put this mill together and take it apart is on a par with that of the other mills we dismissed.

Via hawleycrescent.ca

Feedbacks: The first thing that you can do is to go online and read the reviews shared by other people. You can also ask around from people you personally know. The insights that they will share can be a good starting point in the evaluation of the possibilities.

Size: Generally speaking, the larger the potato masher is, the more potatoes it can mash within a given time. With this, consider the extent of use that you anticipate to easily decide about the right size.

Plate: Also referred to as the head, this is the one that gets in direct contact with the potato. It is better if it is larger, which can help to significantly speed up the job. Perforated plates are preferred over the zigzag design. The latter allows you to work with minimal effort on your end.

Handle: The design of the handle is equally important as the design of the head. It should be ergonomic, which means that using it will minimize fatigue. It should also be shaped in such a way that it will not easily slip, especially with the application of heavy pressure.

Material: This is an important consideration because it will have an effect on the quality and performance of the potato masher. Stainless steel is the most popular material. Make sure that it is not going to rust and that it will withstand wear and tear.

Ease of Cleaning: You should also choose a potato masher that will be a snap to clean and maintain. This means that it will be easy for you to keep it in its tip-top condition, even after many years of use.

Design Trifecta 360 Knife Block

Admittedly expensive, this handsome block certainly seemed to live up to its billing as “the last knife block you ever have to buy.” The heaviest model in our testing, this block was ultrastable, and its durable bamboo exterior was a breeze to clean. Well-placed medium-strength magnets made it easy to attach all our knives, and a rotating base gave us quick access to them. One tiny quibble: The blade of our 12-inch slicing knife stuck out a little.

Schmidt Brothers Downtown Block

This roomy block completely sheathed our entire winning knife set using just one of its two sides—and quite securely, thanks to long, medium-strength magnet bars. Heavy, with a grippy base, this block was very stable. An acrylic guard made this model extra-safe but also made it a little trickier to insert knives and to clean; the wood block itself showed some minor cosmetic scratching during use.

Schmidt Brothers Midtown Block

This smaller version of the Downtown Block secured all our knives nicely, though the blade of the slicing knife stuck out a bit. With a base lined with grippy material, this block was very stable. An acrylic guard afforded extra protection against contact with blades but made it a little harder to insert knives and to clean; the wood itself got a little scratched during use.

Mashing Plate

There are two types of mashing plate: perforated and wave-style. Between the two, the perforated mashing plate creates smoother potatoes and easier to use. The problem with wave-style mashers though is the large gap that sometimes fails to mash some parts of the potato.

To make a smoother and more even mashed potato, look for a perforated mashing plate with many small holes. The best size of a mashing plate is 10-1square inches as it’s easier to maneuver in all saucepan sizes.

Sturdy Construction

If you want a durable potato masher, choose perforated mashers as they remain rigid during hard mashing. Unlike perforated mashers, wave-shaped counterparts tend to bend easily. The most sturdy mashers are high-quality stainless steel that resists rust and corrosion.

Ease Of Storage

To make your kitchen look neat and clean, you need to keep your tools and equipment organized. An organized kitchen is important if you have limited kitchen space. The best- designed potato mashers are those with a hanging hole for rail storage.

Mash, mix and blend with the Mix ‘N Masher! Its reinforced, flexible nylon head conforms to the shape of your mixing bowl. Use it when you want a smooth consistency—for food like mashed potatoes, guacamole, applesauce, mashed bananas or baby food.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the potato masher by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your potato masher wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of potato masher

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about potato masher is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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